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Ethical Review : Knixwear

Where are Knixwear made? What certifications do they have to ensure worker safety? Asset Designs contributor, Naomi Boshari, reached out to the brand and get some answers.

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An Ode to the Black Turtleneck

By Rachael Atkinson, Asset Designs Sustainability Intern     “You know, Rachael, some of the most successful people wear the same thing every day” my mom would say to me as I made myself late for school, tormenting over what to wear that day. What a waste of time it was for me to spend my mornings deliberating between two nearly identical belts to finish off my outfit (catch that Devil Wears Prada reference). She would always allude to Steve Jobs and his iconic black turtleneck, and I would scoff at her. This was 2012 and turtlenecks were anything but trendy. Besides, I wanted to work in fashion and I knew women like Anna Wintour wouldn’t be caught dead wearing the...

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The Supply Chain Story of Asset Designs' Flagship Line

By Tessa Battistin (Founder, Asset Designs) At Asset Designs, we are striving for a future where clothing has a cycle of life and death that is expertly managed by farmers, producers, consumers, and municipalities together.  “The facts proving the environmental impact of the garment industry are hard to argue with. Fashion is one of the biggest polluting industries in the world, and in 2016, supply chain waste was estimated at over 800,000 tons. Waste occurs at every stage of the fashion supply chain, and therefore each stage needs unique solutions for reducing waste” (“Valuing Our Clothes: The Cost of UK Fashion”,  Loved Clothes Last, 12). Our pledge for supply chain transparency  How can we manufacture garments with the least environmental...

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#WhoMadeMyClothes: An Inquiry Into 100 Years of Making

By Kate Bauer  (Women in a garment shop, New York City, ca. 1900. Image courtesy of the Kheel Centre) It’s been five years since the collapse of the Rana Plaza factory in Bangladesh that killed 1138 garment workers. Response to the catastrophe reverberated worldwide – these were workers making products for fast fashion retailers – as workers and activists called big box companies to task for their lack of transparency about where their clothing is produced. In the years since then, only a small fraction of the list of large fashion retailers has willingly agreed to make their suppliers public, as many continue to work with garment factories in places where workplace safety and environmental standards allow for cost-cutting measures...

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